B.C. Muslim Women's Shelter Becoming Haven for 'Refugees' from America

B.C. Muslim Women's Shelter Becoming Haven for 'Refugees' from America

A transitional home for Muslim women fleeing domestic violence in B.C. has become a refugee haven as dozens of women and children who have walked across the U.S. border since November's presidential election seek refuge in Canada.

"They come here because they have no option — the last option they have is to come here," said Yasmine Yousef, a social worker at Nisa Homes in Surrey.

The transitional home opened just over two years ago. But now the home used for women seeking shelter from domestic abuse has become a sanctuary for those who fear that the U.S. under President Donald Trump is not safe for them. Many Canadians say that the only thing to fear in the US is being there illegally in the first place and fear that Canada's 'open door policy' is leading to an influx of undereducated and unskilled illegal 'refugees' that are exposing our borders to potential terror threats and at a bare minimum, someone who needs to live of taxpayers support. 

The RCMP has come under criticism for acting as 'bellhops' for illegal border crossers and towns along the Manitoba border are being forced to house asylum seekers by the Liberal government. 

This year alone, 201 asylum seekers were intercepted in British Columbia by the RCMP. In March, across the country, officers arrested 887 people entering Canada from outside an official port of entry, up from the two previous months, bringing the total to 1,860 so far this year. 

According to the Immigrant Services Society of B.C., which provides assistance to new arrivals to Canada, 420 people applied for refugee status in B.C. in the first three months of the year.

The society's executive director, Chris Friesen, said it has turned to shelters like the Surrey facility to help house those asylum seekers.

"When they arrive across the border they are not eligible for up to two months before they can access hardship allowance through the government, so they're on their own," said Friesen.

"On the housing and service side there is a growing demand for services and a lack of services in place."

Canadian calls are rising for the government to put an end to the free-for-all and secure the borders immediately. Many pointing out that legitimate immigrants face a long process to enter legally and granting 'refugees' entry from a country with no war or persecution a slap in the face to those who follow the law. 

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