Forest Bathing Explained

Forest Bathing Explained

“How often do you get outside into nature, to smell the fresh air, walk among trees or kick up some dirt? If you're like most Americans, the answer is: almost never.

In the US, we spend a depressing 93% of each week indoors, a survey sponsored by the EPA shows. And according to the evidence, it's hurting our health.
Enter forest bathing.

The term comes from the Japanese word shinrin-yoku, which means "immersing in the forest atmosphere."

Since the 1980s, the Japanese have managed forests to help citizens relax and reduce stress -- and scientists have measured the results.

"Studies have shown that within 15 minutes of being in nature, your stress level goes down, your heart rate, blood pressure improves," said Dr. Nooshin Razani, a pediatrician and nature researcher with Children's Hospital Oakland. "If you're in nature longer, you can feel less depressed, less anxious. And if you're in nature for a few days, you have much increased creativity and cognitive ability."

And there's another big payoff, Razani said.

"Over the course of a lifetime," she said, "being in nature can lead to less heart disease, as well as improvements in how long people can live."

Read more here: http://www.cnn.com/2017/08/10/health/...

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