The Far Left Turns Its Hate Against Cops and the 'Thin Blue Line'

The Far Left Turns Its Hate Against Cops and the 'Thin Blue Line'

Miosotis Familia was the kind of person most Americans celebrate. She was a strong woman, a loving mother, and eager to work in New York’s tougher neighborhoods as a respected member of its police department.

She wasn’t killed in the line of duty in one of the “usual” ways officers lose their lives. There was no bank robbery shootout; no drug deal gone bad. Instead, Officer Familia was assassinated this July for being part of a now-targeted class of people: cops.

Of the last six members of the NYPD killed on duty, she was the third to be murdered because of her uniform and badge. Another luckily survived a 2014 attack by a man wielding a hatchet in Times Square. The FBI reports that in 2016, 20 officers were similarly killed in ambushes or unprovoked attacks, representing almost a third of all cops killed in action and nearly three times more than the prior year.

As Familia’s body was removed from the hospital, her fellow officers stood in salute of their comrade. Just down the street, firefighters from the FDNY’s Engine 69 climbed atop their rig and unfurled a 3-by-5 symbol of their support. The pennant they bore was a black and white version of the American flag, with a solitary thin blue line replacing the eighth stripe, normally white.

This flag, as well as a basic version with a solitary blue line against a black background, has long been used as a symbol by police officers across the country to show solidarity in the difficult days following a line-of-duty death. Now, they are used more broadly by a growing public seeking to display their support for law enforcement, in a time when many groups on the left, and even celebrities and comedians, are filling the airwaves with anti-police rhetoric.

The thought of writing about the flag came to me as I biked through one of New Jersey’s quaint beach towns this July. I noticed house after house, from simple cottages to multimillion-dollar mansions, proudly displaying either version of the blue line. Not all of them could be cops.

Confirming its growing popularity, the president of Blue Lives Matter NYC, a charity which supports the families of fallen officers, reported that the $40 Blue Line American Flag is their highest grossing item nationwide, while the number of for-profit retailers selling blue line products on Amazon and Ebay corroborates the trend.

At the time, I made a remark to some law enforcement friends about a hunch I had that the more common the flag became in the community, the more it would become emblematic of the broader conservative movement. When that happened, I predicted, it wouldn’t be long before it was seen as some sort of offensive or hate symbol. Even before finishing this column, I was proven right.

Earlier this year, a Florida homeowner’s association claimed a resident’s flag was offensive, and, in another incident, an overly cautious California municipality forced a fire company to remove theirs. Just this weekend, the far-left has declared that the thin blue line is a symbol and logo of white nationalists and neo-Nazis.

While Familia's death is not directly related to those promoting the Blue Line flag as a hate symbol, it points to a troubling trend.

 

Read more from The Hill here

 
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